The girlfriend of Kyle Navin, the suspect in the death of his parents, Jeanette and Jeffrey Navin, is expected to be arraigned in court today.

Jennifer A. Valiante, 31, of Westport, was charged Oct. 30 with conspiracy to commit murder and hindering prosecution in the first degree in connection with the case and was taken into police custody. Her bond was set at $2 million.

The affidavit for Valiante’s arrest warrant delineates grim details leading up to and following the alleged murder.

Jeanette and Jeffrey Navin went missing Aug. 4, and their cell phones were last used that day in the vicinity of the house on Aldine Avenue in Bridgeport that they bought for their son Kyle Navin.

State police expect to serve Kyle Navin with a warrant charging him with his parents’ murder at the federal prison where he is in custody. His bond is $2.5 million.

Kyle Navin has been held in detention on a federal firearms charge since his original arrest Sept. 8. He was named a person of interest in his parents’ disappearance at that time.

Jeffrey and Jeanette Navin’s remains were identified Oct. 30 by the Office of the Chief State Medical Examiner.

The affidavit alleges that Kyle Navin shot his mother in the chest in his blue truck. Detectives discovered two bullet holes in the front passenger seat of the vehicle. The portion of the seat belt which would cross the passenger’s chest also had a bullet hole in it, suggesting there was a person seated in the front passenger seat when at least one of the two rounds were fired.

DNA evidence showed the presence of blood from both parents at Kyle’s Bridgeport home, which state police searched several times under search and seizure warrants during the course of the investigation.

Police found evidence that he also shot his father, possibly in the basement of his home. While processing the basement of the residence, detectives noted that a large area of the wall-to-wall carpeting had been removed. A red-colored carpet adjacent to the bare floor yielded several stains consistent with blood stains.

The forensics lab report indicated a stain found on the top side of this piece of carpet tested positive for the presence of blood. The stain is a mixture of both Kyle Navin and Jeffrey Navin being contributors to the DNA profile.

Missing

On Aug. 7, Jeffrey Navin’s sister, Laura Thompson, and Annie Navin, the wife of Jeffrey Navin’s brother, William Navin, reported Jeanette and Jeffrey’s disappearance to the Easton Police Department.

The Navins had lived in a rental house on Staples Road in Easton since June after selling their house of 21 years on Osborn Hill Road in Weston.

Easton police initiated the investigation but soon involved other state and federal law enforcement agencies in an intensive investigation that went unsolved until Oct. 29 with the discovery of human remains by a homeowner doing yard work at 89 Norfield Road in Weston.

The homeowner, Thomas Kerrigan, his son Brian Kerrigan, and a hired helper were cleaning up Kerrigan’s wooded property which contains an abandoned residence which has been unoccupied for about 10 years.

While moving debris, Kerrigan disturbed a pile of brush and leaves, which he distributed over the property. The debris contained a blue tarp with silver duct tape. When the debris was moved, the contents of the tarp were revealed, and Kerrigan observed what appeared to be human bones.

Also on the property was an object consisting of plastic contractor bags taped together which too had been disturbed by the machine. The bag emitted a strong odor, and contained maggots, the affidavit states. Kerrigan called the Weston Police Department and executed a consent-to-search on the property.

Thomas Kerrigan’s son, Brian Kerrigan, is acquainted with Kyle Navin and has known him since 2007, but has not been close to him lately, according to the affidavit. Kyle Navin has been to the property in the past.

State police detectives from Western District Major Crime, along with assistance of the Weston and Easton police and fire departments, the chief medical examiner, Bridgeport State Attorneys office, FBI, U.S. Marshal, and U.S. Attorney’s office  investigated the remains, and a positive identification for Jeanette and Jeffrey Navin was made Oct. 30.

Strained relationship

Investigators learned that Kyle Navin had a tumultuous relationship with his parents, particularly his father, and the parents planned to cut him off from their will.

Jeanette Navin confided in friends that she was distraught over her son’s painkiller use.

Jeffrey Navin allegedly had been emotionally and verbally abusive with his son, and the Department of Children and Families had been called to intervene in 2006.

Jeffrey Navin was planning to sell J&J Refuse, the waste disposal company he owned in Westport, where Kyle Navin worked as operations manager, and his son would be out of a job.

On Sept. 29, state police police spoke with Kyle Navin’s younger brother, Taylor Navin, who said that during his last conversation with his father in late July, his father had been complaining about Kyle.

Taylor said the relationship between his parents and his brother was “not good at all” and that “it’s always been like that.”

When he was told his brother was a person of interest in the disappearance of their parents, Taylor said, “When I heard my parents were missing I thought to myself … they either went on vacation, or my brother did something to them.”

Cell phone records

The 27-page affidavit contains cell phone records between Kyle Navin and Valiante that state police obtained during the course of their investigation.

Their Apple iPhones were seized under a search and seizure warrant and sent to the state police computer crimes division.

On May 14, Kyle texted about his father ... “I was trying not to punch him in the face and get arrested because if I do punch him I won’t be able to stop. “

He later told Valiante, “We need to figure out what the best way to take them down whether it is to get some money out of them somehow, f…. him at the business the house something we got to figure out. I’m going to be real smart and do it quick.”

Valiante said, “We’ll figure something out.”

On July 14, Kyle texted, …”You know if they ‘went away” … We could customize a nice Cummuns 4 door 5500 with a small 6 yard packer like Malones and take over J&J.”

Valiante texted, “It would be nice.”

On Aug. 3, Kyle texted, “No more waiting.”

Then on Aug. 4, the day his parents were last seen, Kyle texted to Valiante: “You hadn’t gone to basement have you?”

Detention hearing

A detention hearing was held in federal court in Bridgeport Oct. 30 at noon before Magistrate Judge William I. Garfinkel, where Navin’s attorney Eugene Riccio asked that his client be released on the gun charges pending his trial.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Tracy Dayton made the case that Navin should remain in custody.

Kyle Navin looked the picture of health, clean shaven, focused, and attentive and not limping as in a previous hearing, as he entered the courtroom.

Prison guards removed the handcuffs behind his back before he sat down, facing Garfinkel.

Despite Riccio’s argument on behalf of releasing him, using his Bridgeport house as collateral and wearing a GPS bracelet pending trial, Garfinkel ordered Navin to remain in federal prison, citing a flight risk.

Arguing on behalf of the state, Assistant U.S. Attorney Tracy Dayton said human remains of two people had been found the day before in Weston.

“The evidence strongly suggests the suspect killed his parents,” Dayton said. “He is potentially facing murder charges.”

Reporters, law officials and concerned citizens filled the small magistrate’s courtroom at 915 Lafayette Avenue in Bridgeport. Easton Police Chief Tim Shaw was among them, and he was back in Weston later during press conferences led by Trooper First Class Kelly Grant from the state police. Shaw was also in Weston the day before when the remains were discovered.

The remains were identified later in the day on Oct. 30 as those of Jeanette and Jeffrey Navin, and police released the information, once they had notified next of kin.

Navin will not be out of federal prison any time soon.