Christian Abraham - Hearst Connecticut Media
As Saturday afternoon led into evening, there were some nervous glances exchanged among Trumbull Day officials. Rain clouds were building, and the decision had been made hours earlier that the fireworks would go on — rain or no rain.

“You have to make a decision early in the day whether to postpone the fireworks or not,” said Kathy McGannon, clerk of the Trumbull Day Commission. “It takes time to load the fireworks. Once they’re loaded, they can’t be unloaded, so they were going to get shot off Saturday night no matter what.”

The weather forecast Saturday morning called for heavy rain in the late afternoon, but a series of phone calls between Trumbull officials and meteorologist Gil Simmons confirmed that the rain should be ending by early evening. That forecast turned out to be right on the money, McGannon said.

“At about 5:30, the heavy rain started falling, and sent people running for cover,” she said. “But it was almost like a community gathering, with people huddled under tents. Others ran for their cars, but they stayed, and after about 10 minutes the skies cleared.”

But if the rain had stopped, everything was still wet. Volunteers armed with handfuls of paper towels set to work drying the chairs near the main stage as the band resumed playing. Within minutes, they were joined by an unlikely workforce, McGannon said.

“All the kids that were there started helping out,” she said. “There was an army of 6-and 7-year-old kids wiping chairs.”

The children were joined by members of the committee.

“The volunteers and committee members were great all during the planning and weekend,” McGannon said. “Everyone knew what to do, and did it. They made my job really easy.”

As an added benefit, the temperatures dropped about 15 degrees after the rain, making for one of the more comfortable fireworks displays in recent memory.

Other than the slight weather concern, McGannon said the two-day festival went off without a hitch, with solid attendance Friday and good crowds throughout Saturday.

“The entertainment was spaced out throughout the day, and people were walking around,” she said. “Then later on, people started coming in to have dinner, ride the rides, and wait for the fireworks.”

With Trumbull Day 2019 officially in the books, McGannon said the committee had already begun preparing for next year’s event. The vendors and food trucks have expressed a desire to return — most of them specifically asking for the same location — for Trumbull Day 2020, she said.