An injured stray, that a veterinarian says may have been hit by a car or possibly beaten with an object, is in the process of recovering at the Trumbull Animal Shelter.

The mixed-breed female was picked up by Trumbull Animal Control on Saturday, in the area of Stern Village, after someone reported seeing the dog.

“At first we thought she was hit by a car but the vet said it looks like someone may have hit the dog with something,” Animal Control Officer Lynn Dellabianca said. “I don’t think we will ever know for sure what caused her injuries.”

The dog, who volunteers and animal control officers have started calling Zena, appears to be a mix with some pit bull and possibly Labrador or a hunting dog breed.

“She is a nice dog and she seems pretty sweet,” Dellabianca said. “We’re just looking to get her fixed up so she can start a new life.”

Zena spent a few days at VCA Shoreline Animal Hospital. She has a broken leg and other injuries. The leg will likely need surgery, since it could be broken at the joint. They are waiting to hear back from the veterinarians about the X-rays. Dellabianca said the surgery is likely to be pricey.

They can’t say for sure if Zena was abandoned and will hold her for a time in case she is redeemed. Zena appears to be about two years-old, which is a common age for dogs to be abandoned.

“It’s about the age where the dogs are getting to be bigger and full size and some dogs get too jumpy or unmannered if they haven’t been trained,” she said.

That can lead some owners to decide to abandon a dog, though Dellabianca said economic reasons or a move can also be part of the problem. Zena may have been abandoned through no fault of her own, the animal control officer said.

“She seems to have a soulful look about her,” Dellabianca said.

With mounting medical bills, the Trumbull Animal Group is asking for donations to support Zena’s recovery. Checks should be made out to Trumbull Animal Group (TAG) and mailed to Gail Marshall, President of TAG, 287 Booth Hill Road, Trumbull, CT 06611. Donations are tax-deductible.

Without donations through groups like TAG, an injured stray like Zena is likely to be euthanized, as towns don’t have the money to pay for medical bills.

“Donations would absolutely help save her life,” Dellabianca said.

One bright spot in Zena’s story is that someone has already expressed interest in adopting her.