Families, emergency workers hear from Trumbull on Memorial Day

Trumbull resident William Murphy, wearing his 1992 Barnum Festival Ringmaster attire, waves to passing traffic at noon on Memorial Day during the town's one-minute noise salute to veterans and emergency responders.

Trumbull resident William Murphy, wearing his 1992 Barnum Festival Ringmaster attire, waves to passing traffic at noon on Memorial Day during the town's one-minute noise salute to veterans and emergency responders.

Donald Eng / Hearst Connecticut Media

TRUMBULL — William Murphy was a one-man circus for a minute on Memorial Day. The Trumbull resident, 82, heeded First Selectman Vicki Tesoro’s call to step outside at noon to cheer, shout, blow horns or ring bells for 60 seconds.

The sound salute was intended to let the families of deceased veterans and Trumbull’s emergency responders hear “cheers will be heard echoing from the Merritt Parkway to Route 25, from the Pequonnock Trail to Unity Park,” Tesoro said.

Murphy took it a few steps further, stepping out in his ceremonial red coat and tails and top hat and greeting traffic on Daniels Farm Road.

“What’s noisier than a circus?” asked Murphy, the 1992 Barnum Festival Ringmaster. At precisely noon, Murphy’s ringmaster’s whistle was clearly audible over a symphony that included cheers, shouts, sirens, and children banging pots and pans.

The noon noise was Trumbull’s response to the coronavirus pandemic that forced towns to cancel their annual Memorial Day parades.