For type 2 diabetes, try substituting whole ancient grains into your diet with Khorasan Wheat Tabbouleh

Khorasan Wheat Tabbouleh incorporates olive oil, lemon juice and khorasan wheat to create a recipe that is a good alternative to wheat-based recipes for diabetics.

Khorasan Wheat Tabbouleh incorporates olive oil, lemon juice and khorasan wheat to create a recipe that is a good alternative to wheat-based recipes for diabetics.

Contributed/Kamut Brand Khorasan Wheat

A complete dietary overhaul isn’t always the solution for diabetics. Sometimes, an ingredient substitution is what is needed to keep those familiar tastes and flavors while eating foods that are helping, not exascerbating, the chronic disease.

Take naturally gluten-free ancient whole grains vs. refined whole grains.

Research has shown that a replacement diet with products made with organic ancient khorasan wheat “could provide additive protective effects in reducing glucose, insulin, lipd and inflammatory risk factors, and in restoring blood redox balance in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients compared to diet with product made with modern organic wheat,” according to a 2017 article in the European Journal of Nutrition.

Khorasan Wheat Tabbouleh

1 cup Kamut Brand khorasan wheat bulgur

2 tablespoons olive oil

3 tablespoons lemon juice

1 teaspoon sea salt

½ teaspoon pepper

1 cup chopped parsley

1 cup diced tomatoes

½ cup sliced green onion

Place bulgur in a large bowl. Pour 2 cups of boiling water over bulgur and let soften for 30 minutes. The bulgur will absorb most of the liquid.

In a large bowl, whisk together olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper.

Drain bulgur in a strainer. Remove any excess water from it by squeezing small handfuls in your palm before adding to dressing.

Add parsley, tomatoes and green onion, and toss well to coat evenly.

Source: Kamut Brand Khorasan Wheat

Twenty-one patients with type 2 diabetes were included in randomized, double-blinded crossover trial conducted by Italian researchers. The participants were assigned to eat bread, pasta, crackers and biscuits made using semi-whole flour from organic wheat that was either from ancient khorasan wheat or modern-control wheat for eight weeks in random order, according to the study. Laboratory tests were taken at the beginning and end of two intervention phases.

Results showed that the “metabolic risk profile improved only after the khorasan intervention period, as measured by a reduction in total and LDL (low-density lipoproteins or “bad”) cholesterol (3.7-3.4 percent less); insulin (16.3 percent less); and blood glucose (9.1 percent less).”

julie.garcia@chron.com

Twitter: @reporterjulie